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Thread: Doctor 101

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    Doctor 101

    Aight gang take a seat. Class has started and Professor Ishida's in the house to give you the rundown on how to not "ohgodohfuck" as a doctor.


    Lesson 1: The most important one
    Read the wiki. It's literally that simple. The wiki is your Bible and you should absolutely study it and use it for reference lest you intend on malpractice. As a doctor your most commonly used wiki pages will be surgery and chemistry. My biggest recommendation to anyone interested in learning medbay is to study surgery and follow a doctor in observe mode for a few rounds before actually playing. Some surgeries require a level of urgency, so the better prepared you are, the greater chance you have at getting that patient in and out of the OR in one piece. As a doctor, you don't really need to memorize the guide to medicine wiki page, however it's still worth reading as it gives a general overview of everything medical related such as types of injuries, symptoms, tools, etc. Since it's important for you to read the wiki, I'm going to try not to be redundant in this guide and instead provide you the information that I've gathered outside of the wiki from my own experience and experimentation.


    Lesson 2: Chemistry
    Chemistry's pretty simple, it just takes some acclimation to get efficient at it. Furthermore, it's going to be important for you to have a recipe list with pre-calculated quantities of chemicals. The recipes on the wiki page show you the ratios you need to make 2-3 units of the given chemical, but you're gonna want to write down the big batch numbers for reference later. One thing to keep in mind is that depending on the chemical, a 3-ingredient recipe can either make 2 units or 3 units of the chemical. It'll be handy to make a note of which chemicals make only 2 units for 3 ingredients.

    Let's talk numbers. There are a maximum of 16 pills in a bottle. Each pill can potentially hold 60u of a chemical (although generally most pills are around 15u). The Bluespace Beaker aka the Holy Grail can hold up to 300u (wow that's a lot). For a batch of chems that fills one pill bottle, you will generally want either a total of 120u or 240u. Both these numbers divide beautifully by 16 and provide pills that are easy to work with within general OD limits. 120 units will make 16 7.5u pills. You will (generally) always be able to administer two 7.5u pills without OD. In general, most pills you make will have 7.5u of a chemical, such as tricord, kelotane, dermaline, and bicard, unless you want to make them extra strong and do 15u. Keep in mind that making extra-strength pills will take up more time and resources which may not be the most convenient when you have 5 medics asking for a lifesaver bag's worth of custom pills.
    So 120 is the common amount of a chemical when you make a batch of pills for it. HOWEVER this is the medbay and single-chem pills are WEAK. You'll most often be making combo drugs such as KeloDerm (Kelotane and Dermaline) and TriBica (Tricordrazine and Bicaridine). This means you'll have 120 units of each (assuming you're using a 1:1 ratio which is likely), and therefore a total of 240 units in your glorious 300u Bluespace Beaker. Remember that. 240 units. The result is sixteen 15u pills that each have 7.5u of chemical A and 7.5u of chemical B.

    Was that enough numbers for you? Just remember that when you make your recipe, you will often want 7.5u of the chemical in a pill, and 120u of the chemical per batch.

    Remember that as you use the chem dispenser, you will use up power. This resource will restore over time, but if you're using it heavily, it will affect your ability to make large batches of chems at once. One of the biggest tips I have for being efficient with chem-dispenser power is to utilize the Weylandmed. The following chemicals are provided for you in large quantities in the Weymed:
    • Bicaridine 60u
    • Kelotane 60u
    • Tramadol 20u
    • Dexalin 60u
    • Dylovene 60u
    • Inaprovaline 60u

    There are 4 bottles of each, which means an entire batch's worth of ingredients at your disposal for free. Just remember to restock the bottles into the Weymed (click+drag) when you're done.

    One thing I didn't realize when I first started doing chemistry is that there is no in-game mechanic for combo drugs. Putting Kelotane and Dermaline together in a pill doesn't create some magic 3rd chemical. It's literally just those two chemicals confined inside a pill. Dunno if that helps anyone, but that confused me a lot when I first did chems and tried to make combo drugs. And the reason that combo drugs are helpful is that instead of having 15u of one chemical in a pill healing at its own rate, you can have multiple chemicals in one pill healing at their own rates simultaneously. Both chemicals heal independently, albeit at their own pace. Dermaline does the exact same thing as Kelotane, it's just faster. Having more units of Dermaline doesn't increase the rate of healing, however. It just increases the duration that the Dermaline is in your system. While that technically means that more units = more healing over time, we want our pills to do more in less time. Because of this, we want both Kelotane and Dermaline working side by side to heal a large amount of burn damage in shorter amount of time than just Dermaline alone. Combo drugs are also important because of each chemicals' individual OD limit. Of course, a lot of Dermaline will heal more burn damage than a lot of Kelotane, but there is a hard limit on how much of each you can put in a person. Using a combo drug allows us to "bypass" the obstacle of OD limits because we can heal a lot using both drugs without ODing on either.

    You're free to experiment with your own recipes as you develop a preference for how you like to do your chemistry, but if you're here for a quick chem reference guide, these are my tried and true recipes:

    The numbers represent the unit ratio of each ingredient in the mix, respectively. Anything in italics, it means that you can use the Weymed for the ingredient instead of the dispenser.

    • ImiAlky 10/5 (Great for brain and eye damage): 120 Dylovene, 40 Chlorine, 40 Nitrogen, 80 Carbon, 80 Hydrogen


    • TriBica 7.5/7.5 (For brute damage): 60 Inaprovaline, 60 Dylovene, 120 Bicaridine
    • TriBica 15/15 (Extra-strength): 60 Inaprovaline, 60 Dylovene, 120 Bicaridine -> MAKE 8 PILLS (max per batch is 240, remember?). Repeat to make total 16 pills.


    • KeloDerm 7.5/7.5 (For burn damage): 80 Carbon, 80 Silicon, 40 Phosphorous, 40 Oxygen
    • KeloDerm 15/15 (Extra-strength): 80 Carbon, 80 Silicon, 40 Phosphorous, 40 Oxygen -> 8 pills. Repeat.
    • KeloDerm 7.5/7.5 (Alternate method): 160 Kelotane, 40 Phosphorous, 40 Oxygen


    • Dexalin Plus 15 (For respiratory damage): 80 Dexalin, 80 Carbon, 80 Iron


    • Oxycodone 10 (stronk painkill): 80 Tramadol, 80Ethanol, 1 Phoron -> 8 pills. Repeat.


    • IronSugar 7.5/7.5 (Restores blood): 120 Iron, 120 Sugar


    • Cryoxadone 120 (for the cryo tubes): 40 Dexalin, 40 Water, 40 Oxygen
    • Clonexadone 240 (Better than cryox): 40 Dexalin, 40 Water, 40 Oxygen, 120 Sodium, 5 Phoron
    • Clonex simplified: 120 Cryoxadone, 120 Sodium, 5 Phoron



    Lesson 3: Surgery
    Ok, you've got the patient on the operating table, how do you not kill them? Surgery is the scariest part of playing the role at first, since it can determine whether the patient lives. In all honesty, though, it's very rare that you get a patient who is within dying range in your OR. If the patient is close to dead, then the medics didn't do their job correctly. Although surgery seems daunting at first, you'll very quickly realize just how repetitive it is. The best advice I can give is to just study the wiki and get used to doing the surgery in-game. One recommendation I have is to read over the wiki and observe a doctor for a few rounds. You'll be able to watch them go through the steps so you can know what to expect before you get into the OR for the first time. It's also important that you know your surgeries ahead of time because some surgeries will require urgency, such as alien embryo removal, IB, and lung rupture. The better prepared you are, the sooner the player can get in and out of medbay in one piece.

    I don't think that the wiki emphasizes "Combining Surgeries" enough. It makes it seem like some advanced technique when in reality, combined surgeries will comprise most of the surgeries you perform. The two most common surgeries that you'll need to get really good at are, in order, bone repair and alien embryo removal. Bone repair will be a part of nearly every surgery you do, as it's hard (if possible at all) to get IB or organ damage without breaking the bones as well.

    The Surgery Checklist
    Keep the patient scan open and use this checklist to guide yourself through surgery.
    • Administer any pills you'll need e.g. bicaridine, dexalin, QC.
    • Use the incision management system
    • Internal bleeding? Use Fix-O-Vein
    • [CHEST ONLY] Unknown body present AND organ damage?
      Circular saw, retractor, hemostat (repeat until nothing left), trauma kit, retractor, bone gel
    • Unknown body present?
      If chest -> Circular saw, retractor, hemostat (repeat until nothing left), retractor, bone gel
      If anywhere else -> use hemostat (repeat until nothing left)
    • Organ damage?
      If chest -> Circular saw, retractor, trauma kit, retractor, bone gel
      If groin -> trauma kit
    • Broken bone? Use bone gel, bone setter
    • Necrotizing? Use scalpel, trauma kit. Repeat as necessary.
    • Use cautery

    This checklist will get you through pretty much most surgeries that you'll have to perform. The only ones not included are facial reconstruction, amputation, and limb replacement. Those surgeries don't follow the cookie-cutter format so make sure you learn how to do them.

    Quick note about limb replacement: you can just replace a hand or foot. It works the same as replacing the whole limb. So print off the arm/leg, do the other necessary steps, and apply the robot arm/leg. It'll replace just the part that's missing.

    One thing that will help before doing surgery is to use holo-cards. If there is an extra doctor or a lingering medic, ask them to assign holo-card to patients as they're being scanned. This is incredibly helpful as it will help prioritize the patients so it's not just a massive wave of people that you have to check individually. Just thought I'd put that in this section since it's a useful tip and will expedite your surgeries and ensure that you always tend to the highest priority patients first.

    The last thing I'll cover about surgery are the two situations that are a pain in the ass and can be stress-inducing if you're not familiar with them or prepared for them.

    Ruptured lungs
    Even now, I still hate this surgery. Ruptured lung is a pain in the ass to deal with because it means that using anesthesia does not work on the patient. Ruptured lungs are so shitty that they even get their own type of damage to fuck someone up with. So not only is PFC Jim suffering brute damage from getting AP FF'ed by his squadmate, he has to deal with the ever-increasing respiratory damage as well. So how do you fix it without using the anesthesia? There's two solutions, both of which I recommend you prepare to have on you in case these situations occur. The first (and the one I prefer) is to use the anesthesia autoinjectors from the Weymed. These autoinjectors contain soporific and chloral hydrate to knock out the patient chemically. Super handy. One or two injectors will be enough to keep the patient under for long enough to repair the lung. Alternatively, you can administer oxycodone so that they don't feel anything as you perform surgery. Once the lung is repaired, you should be able to properly connect them to the operating table. Also remember to give them dexalin/dexalin plus to heal the respiratory damage. Peridaxon is also handy.

    Bone re-breaking
    This is listed on the wiki, but I will emphasize it again here since I had a lot of trouble with it when first starting out. If the patient's brute damage is over 50, you can't fix bones. If you don't know this, you'll just be standing there freaking out like what the fuck I'm applying the bone gel and bone setter over and over again aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa it's not fixing (aka me when it first happened to me). So give them the bicaridine before you do surgery. If the medic missed a spot, apply a trauma kit. Just get that brute damage down and you're good to go.


    Lesson 3: The Autodoc
    Use it. It's that simple. DO NOT USE AUTOMATIC MODE. Give the patient a scan, pop them in, queue up the surgeries, and hit start. The autodoc should always be in use, especially when you don't have hands to spare. The best patients to use an autodoc on are ones with multiple injuries, especially multiple broken bones. Trying to fix 4-5 broken bones in the OR is extremely tedious, especially when there are more important surgeries to tend to. Let the machine fix all those bones while you take care of the patient with IB, shrapnel, and broken bones all in the chest. Remember, you can easily combine surgeries in one area. It's much more difficult to tend to multiple injuries in multiple areas. Save yourself the trouble and use the autodoc.


    Lesson 4: The Cryo Tubes
    Use them. It's that simple. The medbay has two cryoxadone beakers at roundstart. Pop them in the tubes and turn them on. Cryo tubes are great for critical patients with lots of brute and/or burn damage. Got a guy in a stasis bag with a billion damage? Cryo tube. Just successfully defibbed a guy with a billion damage? Cryo tube. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of using cryo tubes to stabilize patients. It gets even better if you make your own special cryo mix. The possibilities are endless.


    Bonus Lesson: Medibots
    Is CM the only SS13 server you play? Have you ever wondered how to make one of those little medibots that go around jabbing people with tricord? Look no further, here's how to make one.

    Instructions
    • Print off a robot arm (left or right, doesn't matter)
    • Acquire a proximity sensor. Research has some. Alternatively ask requisitions or engineering to print one for you. If the pilot's workshop is open, you can use the autolathe there. You can wrench a rack/table for metal and pop out a window by using screwdriver->crowbar->screwdriver for the glass. An MP might yell at you for disassembling the window. That player is a very sad person who probably doesn't have much else to live for. Tell them it's for medical purposes, and that might be a good enough excuse.
    • Empty a first-aid kit. Put the health analyzer in your bag for later.
    • Put the robot limb on the empty first aid kit
    • Put the health analyzer on the first aid kit (it's called a robot arm/first aid kit assembly or something now. Doesn't matter)
    • (Optional) Use a pen on the assembly to name your medibot.
    • Put the proximity sensor on the medibot. It's now complete. Recommended that you finish this step wherever you want to deploy the medibot, as you cannot pick it up (although you can drag it around).



    Closing Remarks
    I hope this guide was helpful. Everything posted here should help you become a better doctor and become better at treating the swarms of patients that come in. This is especially true in the age of Ssethtide, where we see a lot of new players, especially in the medbay. If you're one of those players, welcome to medbay! I know that it can be daunting to try new things, especially with such a complex system like medical mechanics. Hopefully, with this guide you will no longer be a bald doctor. Bald doctors result in upset players. Don't be bald. When in doubt, refer to the wiki. Use my chem tips to dish out sweet pharmaceutical goodness to the line of hungry medics. Use the surgery checklist to fix up crit patients in record time. Most importantly, practice, practice practice. Don't be afraid. You will only get better if you just play. It's possible that your first few rounds as a doctor will be stressful and confusing. That's the nature of the game. Some rounds suck. Hopefully this guide makes it so that you suck less. You will get better over time as you get used to it and if you use the advice in this guide as well as the other guides on this forum.

    I highly, highly, highly recommend checking out Tobinerd's Research and Paper Archives. They are an excellent medical player who's spent a lot of time putting together a library of useful guides and documents. In particular, their Medbay Commandments, Chem Recipes, and Autodoc Guide are super useful to look over/refer to.


    Ok, class dismissed. Get out there, set that doctor role preference to "high," and OD your first patient un-kick some ass!
    Kenji Ishida - A pretty good doctor, mediocre engineer, and god-awful shot.

  2. #2
    Senior Mentor nerocavalier's Avatar
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    Straight iron is better than a split of iron and sugar. 15 Dex+ per pill is overkill because 1u is enough heal all oxygen damage, it just metabolizes quickly. 3-5 is a good range for dex+ depending on how much you trust medics and their ability to apply peridaxon after giving dex+.

    The oxycodone is tediously slow because while you need to balance time and energy, time should always come first because medics have a limited window to get pills. Personally, I recommend using this chem guide TobiNerd made and then adjusting it for your ends.
    Spoiler Spoiler:
    Last edited by nerocavalier; 04-14-2019 at 01:43 AM. Reason: fixed my math
    Troublesome, as usual.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nerocavalier View Post
    Straight iron is better than a split of iron and sugar. 15 Dex+ per pill is overkill because 1u is enough heal all oxygen damage, it just metabolizes quickly. 3-5 is a good range for dex+ depending on how much you trust medics and their ability to apply peridaxon after giving dex+.

    The oxycodone is tediously slow because while you need to balance time and energy, time should always come first because medics have a limited window to get pills. Personally, I recommend using this chem guide TobiNerd made and then adjusting it for your ends.
    Spoiler Spoiler:
    You'll notice I ref their chem guide at the end ;) But yeah tbh dex is the one chem I really don't know much about its heal rate. Again these are just my recipes I've developed over time, but I don't know everything. This is just the stuff that's worked for me and I consider myself pretty good (is that narcissistic?). This is good info I'll keep in mind tho, thanks!
    Kenji Ishida - A pretty good doctor, mediocre engineer, and god-awful shot.

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    Senior Mentor nerocavalier's Avatar
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    I figured it'd be easier to have it here instead of needing to have another page up. The rest of the guide is solid, the only things I'd add is to mention "Always autodoc before surgery" to get people into habit of using it. It's not ideal since you're not cherrypicking the most time consuming but better it be used than to sit empty.

    You should also mention that giving peridaxon works for ruptured lungs so they can breathe the sleepy gas to go under unless you know 10 million lung damage or something.

    The one thing I'd strongly disagree with is cryo since you have every tool possible to not need it. Inaprovaline stops people freshly defibbed from dying, especially if you provide them chems to heal them too and you can just quick clot or stasis them until it's their turn for autodoc or surgery. Sure, you can stuff them in but then that opens human error for forgetting them and you'll still need to fix their bones too.
    Last edited by nerocavalier; 04-14-2019 at 04:33 AM.
    Troublesome, as usual.

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    Very helpful guide. I'll be sure to use this when I play MD. The advice about using the AutoDoc for patients with broken bones in multiple areas was especially useful since I dread those surgeries the most.

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    Quote Originally Posted by xeroxemnas View Post
    Very helpful guide. I'll be sure to use this when I play MD. The advice about using the AutoDoc for patients with broken bones in multiple areas was especially useful since I dread those surgeries the most.
    Glad to hear it! And yea, I think the autodoc is best used to clear out those patients that have a lot of injuries but aren't high priority. Multiple broken bones, multiple embedded objects, etc.
    Kenji Ishida - A pretty good doctor, mediocre engineer, and god-awful shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grinkgo View Post
    Instructions
    • Print off a robot arm (left or right, doesn't matter)
    • Acquire a proximity sensor. Research has some. Alternatively ask requisitions or engineering to print one for you. If the pilot's workshop is open, you can use the autolathe there. You can wrench a rack/table for metal and pop out a window by using screwdriver->crowbar->screwdriver for the glass. An MP might yell at you for disassembling the window. That player is a very sad person who probably doesn't have much else to live for. Tell them it's for medical purposes, and that might be a good enough excuse.
    • Empty a first-aid kit. Put the health analyzer in your bag for later.
    • Put the robot limb on the empty first aid kit
    • Put the health analyzer on the first aid kit (it's called a robot arm/first aid kit assembly or something now. Doesn't matter)
    • (Optional) Use a pen on the assembly to name your medibot.
    • Put the proximity sensor on the medibot. It's now complete. Recommended that you finish this step wherever you want to deploy the medibot, as you cannot pick it up (although you can drag it around).
    Don't they not work anymore? Last time I made a Medibot it just stood around in medbay completely ignoring all and everyone with injuries coming in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kazuku_myo View Post
    Don't they not work anymore? Last time I made a Medibot it just stood around in medbay completely ignoring all and everyone with injuries coming in.
    I made one recently and it seemed to work. It ran around trying to inject everyone. However I do believe that using inserted chemicals doesn't work. I've tried putting in a beaker of chems but the amount never goes down. It seems to still just use tricord. Janibots are definitely wonky though.
    Kenji Ishida - A pretty good doctor, mediocre engineer, and god-awful shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grinkgo View Post
    I made one recently and it seemed to work. It ran around trying to inject everyone. However I do believe that using inserted chemicals doesn't work. I've tried putting in a beaker of chems but the amount never goes down. It seems to still just use tricord. Janibots are definitely wonky though.
    Strange. When I put a Tricord beaker inside, it didn't do anything.

    Also, I don't think cryotubes work either. They do freeze people, yes, but they don't inject medicine. Have tried that countless times now with various freezer settings, doesn't do anything.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kazuku_myo View Post
    Strange. When I put a Tricord beaker inside, it didn't do anything.

    Also, I don't think cryotubes work either. They do freeze people, yes, but they don't inject medicine. Have tried that countless times now with various freezer settings, doesn't do anything.
    I have heard that they are being worked on/broken but they do work. I just set the freezer to 1 (I dont think it works aside from you setting and forgetting it). And then you put in a beaker of the cyro stuff (2 of them spawn in on the north table in the main part surgery). You dont inject other medicine, I think it is the cyro medicine heals them. I don't think I have ever seen it USE the medicine, but works.

    Someone correct me if I am wrong.

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